Trending on Moneyweb
Top articles and comments, based on the Moneyweb Insiders activity.
The top shared articles of past 24hours.
    Ingé Lamprecht / 23 April 2019 The long-term interventions required will, almost without exception, be unpopular among voters.
     39      34
    Patrick Cairns / 23 April 2019 Why should we care if the asset management industry is dominated by men?
     24      7
    Colin McClelland / 23 April 2019 South African founder who dropped out of high school is now a global tech player.
     19      1
    Paul Richardson, Bloomberg / 23 April 2019 The storm may bring 'life-threatening weather' to Mozambique and Tanzania, according to AccuWeather.
     14      0
    Adriaan Kruger / 23 April 2019 Stats show that the number of people who experienced hunger in SA decreased by around 50% between 2002 and 2017.
     7      2
    Bob Van Voris, Bloomberg / 23 April 2019 Ousmane Bah insists he is innocent.
     4      0
    Ana Monteiro and Felix Njini, Bloomberg / 23 April 2019 Minister says the government has the problem 'well under control'.
     4      28
    Katherine Chiglinsky and Gerry Smith, Bloomberg / 23 April 2019 The decline of advertising gradually turned the newspaper industry 'from monopoly to franchise to competitive', says Buffet.
     3      1
    Michael Hytha and Lydia Mulvany, Bloomberg / 23 April 2019 Maker of vegan chicken and beef substitutes plans to sell 8.75m shares for $19 to $21 each.
     3      1
    Dana Hull, Bloomberg / 23 April 2019 CEO says 1m Teslas, fully capable of driving themselves, will be on the road by mid-2020.
     2      0
    Moneyweb / 23 April 2019 Amcu workers head back to work, Standard Bank shareholders to vote on climate change, Mr Price to list on A2X and more.
     2      0
    Sinéad Carew, Reuters / 23 April 2019 Energy stocks jump on oil boost.
     2      0
    Sam Kim and Mark Gurman, Bloomberg / 23 April 2019 Company hoping to avoid another fiasco following the fire problems experienced with some Note 7 phones.
     2      0
    Matt Townsend, Bloomberg / 23 April 2019 The company maintained that its entertainment slate is healthy this year, driven by Magic: The Gathering Arena.
     1      0
    Molly Smith, Bloomberg / 23 April 2019 The proceeds of the sale will be used for general corporate purposes, including investing in content, production and development.
     1      0
    Olivia Kumwenda-Mtambo and Naledi Mashishi, Reuters / 23 April 2019 Chemicals and fertiliser company Omnia Holdings was the top performer on the blue-chip index.
     1      0
    Ditas Lopez and Andreo Calonzo, Bloomberg / 23 April 2019 As many as 30 people are feared trapped in a supermarket in Pampanga.
     1      0
    Tom Wilson, Reuters / 23 April 2019 Traders and analysts ascribed the jump to technical forces.
     1      0
    Marc Jones, Reuters / 23 April 2019 Oil surges on the US decision to tighten sanctions on Iran.
     1      0
    Aaron Saldanha, Reuters / 23 April 2019 Chinese shares weakened on concerns of Beijing trimming support to the economy.
     1      0
The top shared articles of the past 7 days.
    Amogelang Mbatha, Bloomberg / 18 April 2019 'The credibility of the office has plummeted,' says Corruption Watch director.
     264      26
    Riaan Campbell / 21 April 2019 There are three basic investment options available to income investors.
     193      2
    Stealthy Wealth / 21 April 2019 'Normal' is often not very efficient and far from optimal - especially when it comes to planning for retirement.
     180      7
    Colleen Goko, Bloomberg / 19 April 2019 Zimbabwean businessman Strive Masiyiwa says the move to rand could introduce some price stability.
     172      1
    Adriaan Kruger / 17 April 2019 Plans to reopen the Steenkampskraal mine, which sits on one of the world's largest reserves of strategic rare earth minerals, are proceeding steadily.
     152      6
    Makgopa Tshehla / 20 April 2019 By conservative estimation, Kusile and Medupi debt costs amount to R300bn.
     141      24
    Tebogo Tshwane / 18 April 2019 Ayo executive gives candid account of governance issues at the company after being subpoenaed to appear before the commission.
     112      8
    Joris Tieleman / 22 April 2019 The economics taught at university poorly reflects real world issues, whether they are political, environmental or social.
     112      9
    Antony Sguazzin, Bloomberg / 17 April 2019 Social, economic and governance measures deteriorate drastically in the past 12 years.
     108      18
    Janina Slawski / 22 April 2019 Most investment portfolios are made up of a combination of cash, bonds, property and equities, here's what it means.
     106      3
    Susan Steward / 19 April 2019 The top money-related questions South Africans asked Google in 2018.
     105      2
    Patrick Cairns / 17 April 2019 Why central bank independence is about more than monetary policy – it's a democratic imperative.
     101      4
    Nqobile Dluda, Reuters / 19 April 2019 The proposed deal will see Wiese's voting interest reduced to 17.8% from 42.3%.
     94      4
    Colleen Goko and Paul Vecchiatto, Bloomberg / 19 April 2019 Documents show the government was forced to pay R5bn in emergency funds so Eskom could meet obligations.
     92      11
    Mfuneko Toyana, Reuters / 19 April 2019 Head of AgriSA says an alternative report has been released on 'proven agricultural practice and sustainable economic growth.'
     90      7
    Ingé Lamprecht / 18 April 2019 In an environment of negative sentiment, mispricing may create opportunities.
     88      10
    Colin McClelland / 18 April 2019 New Cape Town AC Marriott hotel aimed at mid-level travellers.
     82      1
    Steven Friedman / 20 April 2019 The number of protests across SA have not increased, they have just become more noticed.
     82      12
    Peter Castleden / 21 April 2019 Going direct to the consumer is not actually a cheaper model.
     80      2
    Moneyweb / 17 April 2019 Health and beauty retailer adds 18 new pharmacies during reporting period.
     80      0
The top shared articles of the past month.
    Ciaran Ryan / 26 March 2019 Usury expert Emerald van Zyl is waging a campaign for repayment of this overcharge.
     568      17
    Adriaan Kruger / 25 March 2019 Advances in technology make small-scale solar systems more reliable, and they're getting much cheaper.
     409      47
    Riaz Gardee / 11 April 2019 Investors urged to adopt 15-year investment horizon to fully benefit from deal.
     396      16
    Patrick Cairns / 26 March 2019 The Global Optimal Fund of Funds has charged for performance despite sustained weak returns.
     332      27
    Tebogo Tshwane / 5 April 2019 Propertuity, the company that kick-started the urban renewal project in the precinct, will sell its buildings in two weeks.
     330      7
    Amogelang Mbatha, Bloomberg / 18 April 2019 'The credibility of the office has plummeted,' says Corruption Watch director.
     264      26
    Johannes Wessels / 8 April 2019 Financial and business services sector hit hard by financial crisis of 2007/8.
     249      24
    Hilton Tarrant / 10 April 2019 Without IPPs, we would be in a near-perpetual state of Stage 2 load shedding.
     208      28
    Hilton Tarrant / 16 April 2019 When last did you visit a bank branch? And when last did you go into one for anything other than stamped bank statements?
     204      24
    Ciaran Ryan / 4 April 2019 64 JSE companies have rotated auditors since 2017, four years before it becomes mandatory.
     200      2
    Jenny Gordon / 13 April 2019 The change only impacts individuals who are South African tax residents.
     195      21
    Riaan Campbell / 21 April 2019 There are three basic investment options available to income investors.
     193      2
    Stealthy Wealth / 21 April 2019 'Normal' is often not very efficient and far from optimal - especially when it comes to planning for retirement.
     180      7
    Ciaran Ryan / 11 April 2019 Things are getting better, ever so slowly.
     179      55
    Flavia Krause-Jackson, Bloomberg / 8 April 2019 The nation’s economy has partly been dragged down by anaemic growth in SA.
     178      2
    Colleen Goko, Bloomberg / 19 April 2019 Zimbabwean businessman Strive Masiyiwa says the move to rand could introduce some price stability.
     172      1
    Patrick Cairns / 16 April 2019 The power of planning ahead.
     170      17
    Patrick Cairns / 29 March 2019 Markets are long-term machines.
     161      24
    Steve Kretzmann / 25 March 2019 City of Cape Town could use its golf courses and bowling greens for low-cost housing, says report.
     160      38
    Alexander Winning, Reuters / 3 April 2019 Funding measures for Eskom are being given 'serious consideration', says Gordhan.
     158      15
The latest 20 comments.
  1. Bas

    23 April 2019 @ 10:09 pm
  2. Forwards require stopping with apartheid and let the best available lead. In no time the country will be booming as engine for this continent.
  3. Doctor

    23 April 2019 @ 8:28 pm
  4. I agree with you David on what you said but I don't think Liebmann pulled a fast on RMH. As the piece states, RMH ".......brought in a more “experienced” team of seasoned property managers and developer......". This is a problem with some investors: they pump in money and want to call the shots on thing they have no knowledge and experience of. FirstRand is owned by RMH, thence there's a nice roll-up of revenue from FNB and WesBank to the top.
  5. singhprook

    23 April 2019 @ 8:25 pm
  6. Government is the PROBLEM
  7. DeonK

    23 April 2019 @ 7:44 pm
  8. eliminate the problem...and by that everyone will be poorer...work this one out yourself...hint...consumers
  9. nicbyte

    23 April 2019 @ 7:39 pm
  10. SARB controls R180bln in assets. Who controls the bank controls how those assets are spent. As far as I know that money protects our currency. When it is gone our currency will be exposed. Maybe I’m wrong, hell I write code.
  11. Anonymous

    23 April 2019 @ 7:38 pm
  12. That was the old belief back than when things were easier to repair, times have changed. Buy a second hand top of the range car which has depreciated substantially and out of motor plan and wait for something expensive to break or the engine packs up and see if you can afford it.
  13. DeonK

    23 April 2019 @ 7:34 pm
  14. 100% correct...it is not on the brink...it collapsed
  15. Daviddebeer

    23 April 2019 @ 7:26 pm
  16. The DA that took western cape believed emphatically in the liberal values of their founders. The current DA is being transformed into a moderate socialist party. Which is why they lost my vote. That and Herman Mashaba failed to keep his promise to abolish Pikit-Up in jhb when he becomes mayor. I will never forgive him for that.
  17. Daviddebeer

    23 April 2019 @ 7:20 pm
  18. South africa needs to separate the executive from the legislative which can only happen if we directly elect our premiers and presidents. Parties belong in the legislative, not in the executive. The judiciary alone is not sufficient to check the other 2 branches of govt if they are conflated one into thr other. But the politicians need to pass this kind of political reform and they wont because they have everything to lose. In fact this very year submissions from the public to allow us to vote directly for the presidential candidates was struck down by parliament. They wont even discuss it.
  19. Daviddebeer

    23 April 2019 @ 7:10 pm
  20. I was also hopeful with the purple cows but as i started going through the nuts and bolts of their policies and ideas, unfortunately not for me. Still something different on the ballot i guess. But I am too old mow to chuck my vote away for the best of the worst option. Just once i would like to genuinely believe in the candidate i cast my vote for. I will sit this one out until that option comes. Which may well be never but oh well.
  21. Daviddebeer

    23 April 2019 @ 7:01 pm
  22. Short answer? No. Not among the current clowns we have as options
  23. Daviddebeer

    23 April 2019 @ 7:00 pm
  24. Interesting. My take was rather different -- RMIH got involved and didnt do proper due diligence so they belatedly realized that things arent actually going as well in the engine room as the story promoised. Quite possibly Liebmamn pulled a fast one on them and they paid him off and tried to spin it so they dont lose too much face with their own investors. They bought a lemon basically and were too embarassed to admit it. You might be right, though, but my interpretation was a bit different. Also, RMIH is very different company from Firstrand (who owns fnb and rmb).
  25. tievo

    23 April 2019 @ 6:47 pm
  26. The zupta years so soon forgotten? Need to crucify PG instead? Sickening the self righteousness!
  27. Daviddebeer

    23 April 2019 @ 6:46 pm
  28. Basically I agree fully with Nicola Ralston..
  29. Daviddebeer

    23 April 2019 @ 6:45 pm
  30. Tbh, these are criteria I never look at when selecting mutual funds. Performance, the mandate, the philosophy and how consistently they stick to it, fees, portfolio composition and how the fund fits into my needs and ovrrall portfolio -- this is what matters to me. I honestly would not be able to tell you the racial or gender compositions of the managers of my funds. Nor their religious affiliation, sexual orientation, marital status, political persuasion and whether they stayed up all night to watch GOT season 8, episode 1 live. This is one of those topics that vested interests make seem all-important but the truth is the clients/ investors neither care nor take notice. Whats happening with the money we invested matters. That said, allow me this prediction -- obsessing about this social justice transformative correcting nonsense will some day result in investors flagging it as a reason for their managers underperforming and they will switch and then actively start canvassing funds for the gender/ racial/ marital status/ religions orientation so they can avoid social justice transformatively approved funds in future. And these investors would be wrong because bad times happen to anyone. But when funds underperform the client starts looking for reasons why and will flag anything they believe causes a distraction for the fund managers. Last point -- the idea of "not white nen" adding diversity of approach and thought to investing is in my opinion not true. Read the finance journals and watch the shows and you realize divergence of thought is very rare indeed. Most of them think and act the same way.
  31. Millionaire portfolio

    23 April 2019 @ 6:30 pm
  32. wow
  33. Advisor1

    23 April 2019 @ 6:22 pm
  34. Quite correct ! Eskom is too big to fail. It is squarely the Govts problem. I find it amusing that he blames the huge financial difficulty on state capture but where is the stolen money ? Where are the convicted criminals ?
  35. Doctor

    23 April 2019 @ 6:21 pm
  36. This is how I how am reading this piece: 1. Propertuity was running well and had a founder/manager who understand its business and the industry. 2. RMH came with its ill-earned money (exorbitant bank fees charged to FNB clients and swindling car owners via interest rates by WesBank) to "invest" in Propertuity 3. RMH changed the business model and structures of Propertuity and subsequently fired Libyans (the man whom the business relied on). So much for the "skills and experience" of the wealth managers at RMH!!!
  37. Muks

    23 April 2019 @ 6:08 pm
  38. PG what would have happened if the government did not bail out Eskom; when the recent Chinese loan did not materialise? Happened as recent as April 2019
  39. Muks

    23 April 2019 @ 6:07 pm
  40. @AP. The solar panel inspector will come knocking on your door to register these solar panels. Next step is a tax / levy on these solar panels. Checkmate.
The top voted comments of the past 7 days.
  1. MichaelfromKlerksdorp

    17 April 2019 @ 12:40 am
  2. Yes, thank you Ciaran...South Africans acutely KNOW THAT already ;-) We all deal with municipal 'excellence' around us, and continue to witness/experience the slow decline. The People are now enjoying their hard-fought freedom...
  3. TaffyDee

    18 April 2019 @ 7:33 am
  4. We are not surprised, she was was appointed by Zuma.
  5. KCD

    17 April 2019 @ 2:43 am
  6. SA is in crisis mode, municipality service delivery wise. Most people believe that they should have everything free of charge in SA this includes foreigners. Which country has been successful with this way of doing things? People need to be taught that government does not print money just for the sake of printing money. Tax payers keep the country going. Municipalities need to be professionalized and forced to be accountable. We also need to get rid of counselors, money is being wasted here as they always say when being interviewed angazi or I do not have power to influence. Before 1994 SA worked well without them, let take their budget and use it to settle some of the so called indignant unsustainable municipality debt.
  7. Sensei

    17 April 2019 @ 7:35 am
  8. A Mayor is a legalized Robin Hood. He employes the municipal act to steal from property owners. His remuneration depends on how successful he is. An organization that plunders the capitalist class, for the benefit of the socialist class, is called a municipality. There is a whole farcical system called "democracy" that enables and motivates the beneficiaries to loot the minority in a legal way. Anybody with half a brain will realize that this system is flawed and destined to fail. Every collectivist loser will move to the municipality where he can use the law to steal from others. The municipality with the most taxpayers will inevitably attract the largest gathering of looters. Redistribution is short-lived. The taxpayers have been overrun by the plundering hordes. In typical socialist fashion, the municipality begins to appropriate the property of the owner who cannot afford the rates and taxes. It is clear that it won't be long before the municipality owns each and every property within its boundary. Our municipalities are socialist organisations that are slowly appropriating every property without compensation. These redistributive acts are syphoning off a part of the value of our properties already. The municipal act is a catalyst that turns an R8 million house in a security complex into 10 shacks in an informal settlement. Magic!
  9. Commentator

    17 April 2019 @ 7:25 am
  10. Cadre deployment, incompetence, unaccountability, poor service delivery, maladministration and corruption are the root causes for the demise of municipalities.
  11. Africa Pragmatist

    18 April 2019 @ 7:38 am
  12. The ANC have consistently erroded the credibility of every public institution that is there to protect the public and good governance.
  13. Navigator

    23 April 2019 @ 4:50 am
  14. Super article. Of course there isn't. All economies survive and can grow only on energy inputs. This means oil and coal; renewables aren't nearly there yet,and anyway are clearly not up to the job. It it also means that prosperity requires growing per capita energy consumption. If we had honest government and a much better workforce we would do more with the energy at our disposal, but it would still not be enough to create millions of breadwinner jobs, or rebuild our crumbling infrastructure. Sometime this century the world burns through it's remaining oil reserves, and the problems go global. Also, sometime this century we cross the threshold of runaway climate change; and this while the global population grows or tries to grow to around 11bn people. All of these factors kick in around 2050 or about 10 years earlier. It's just arithmetic. Given the mind boggling implications of where we're headed, there's not a politician in the world painting this picture to any electorate; and it's equally hard to imagine any electorate that would buy into such a view. So we kick the can down the road and governments that can print money/debt in frantic efforts to keep the growth engine running. But as available energy runs down, well, debt just becomes unrepayable and more of it is just self defeating. We're actually at or beyond this point as a planet. Who in their right mind imagines that all global debt is repayable? Seriously? So we are about to launch into a future that will look nothing like the recent past, and sadly it has no political solution - no more than anyone believes that any green party will be able to re-freeze the arctic or drop sea levels when they really begin to rise. On the contrary, populism, money printing and free stuff is what the world's politicians have come up with to address the deprivations that are attendant on dwindling energy reserves. Meantime for energy producers, prices are too low for their bottom line to be sustainable, but too high for consumers to be affordable. Eskom is a classic example here, but without a reserve currency of sorts we are unable to square the circle with debt. And so we are rushing towards a point of collapse. I see no signs that our politicians are even vaguely aware of any of this; it's just not on the radar of anyone out there. Instead we have tons of magical thinking peddaled to an electorate that is sleepwalking into a very uncertain future. Bread and circuses were the ancient Roman's answer for a crumbling empire. Trump has his wall, Britain has it's brexit, we have the Xondo commission, and these things are important to deflect the populace from the inevitable rise in inequality, unemployment, and poverty that already lies in our present, but will accelerate into our future.
  15. Dougalan

    18 April 2019 @ 9:13 am
  16. Ever since Mkhwebane switched her offices' TV screens to the Gupta channel the instant she took office, it has been clear what her underlying motives are. She's not fit to stand in Thuli Madonsela's shadow. Needs to be kicked out on her backside ASAP.
  17. leomalan

    18 April 2019 @ 8:59 am
  18. Don't forget EFF
  19. Lance Goodthrust

    23 April 2019 @ 7:24 am
  20. The real question to ask is "Would South African voters actually vote for a political party that could take SA forward?" Knowing that there would be consequences in doing so, including but not limited to job cuts in bloated government departments as well as SOE's, repercussions for offenders (yes even the red light jumpers), jail time for thieves, nurderers, rapists, fraudsters and erring politicians, I honestly do not believe the South African voting populace is mature enough to say "yes". Come 8 May the voters will get the government they deserve and i'm afraid to say it will be more of the same.
  21. cj1

    17 April 2019 @ 8:10 am
  22. Remember those useless, pointless Budget, MTP speeches, by Gordon, Mboweni, how Gvt will fix up municipalities ? Haha.. Instead - the auditors get increased death threats.
  23. Africa Pragmatist

    20 April 2019 @ 7:47 am
  24. You would have to vote out the ANC for any 'lessons from the mega mistakes of Eskom’s mega projects' to have been learnt as Eskom is a sad litmus test of ANC corruption and poor policy (including BEE which ANC corruption feeds off).
  25. Colson

    18 April 2019 @ 10:08 am
  26. Mkhwebane is a disgrace. This is progress according to the ANC: Replace a competent PP with a useless politically motivated individual who seems to have limited knowledge of the law at best. A great example of why we are on the road to disaster.
  27. Navigator

    20 April 2019 @ 4:06 am
  28. ...Ramaphosa has assured investors property rights will be protected. Other (white) South Africans, it seems, will not be so lucky. Land is a hugely emotive issue, made much more so by the underperformance of the economy brought about entirely by the ANC and it's policies. As this performance just worsens under the ANC yoke we will see a ratcheting up, not down of terrible ideas like EWC. Poverty means that people have no assets. EWC means that the asset you thought you had is now worth zero, so it's clearly a destroyer of wealth and a creator of poverty. How this will help the predicament of the people of this country is, like the mining charter, totally unclear. So now we embark on another great poverty creation plan, the destruction of land values in South Africa, and investors I am sure will not be fooled by reassurances from Cyril that they've got nothing to worry about. Quite the contrary. The ANC also totally misses the point that any landlord or property owner in this country works to maintain his property, pays rates and taxes on it, funds other municipal charges, finally pays tax and VAT, employs people, and provides a massive service to society. And the more successful the owner (like a big commercial farmer) the greater the service is. Take this land away and you lose the input and work of the owner, and with it your entire municipal and national tax base. It's like shooting yourself in the head. But a reading of the political manifestos of 90% of the parties out there is enough to tell you that there is no clue of how a modern economy works and that in its place there is just total magical thinking as where the EFF, after applying the most toxic ideas possible, are going to create millions of jobs. So to the head of agri SA I say thank you for being a lone voice of reason even as I'm sure you will probably be branded a racist and totally ignored.
  29. bobsmith

    17 April 2019 @ 8:01 am
  30. It's what happens when you handover to 'freedom fighters' who know nothing
  31. Mandinean

    17 April 2019 @ 7:05 am
  32. Slightly off-topic but … municipalities should be prohibited from blow-your-own-trumpet advertising. These are essentially political adverts which should be paid for by the political party concerned, or self-promotion by the mayor which should be paid for by the mayor concerned.
  33. Sensei

    20 April 2019 @ 8:34 am
  34. In other words, Kusile is the modern-day "Tower of Babel". The Tower of Babel story was about power. Ignorant people with huge egos tried to build Kusile in an attempt to generate power. These overambitious lunatics tried to save everybody from the darkness. Now, as it is failing, people begin to speak different languages. Luthuli House does not understand Eskom, the taxpayers do not understand Luthuli House, the financiers do not understand each other while the voters are communicating via smoke signals as they burn tyres in the streets. Communications collapsed. These powerful cadres are now employing judges as interpreters in an effort to understand each other.
  35. MichaelfromKlerksdorp

    19 April 2019 @ 5:13 pm
  36. It seem generations do not learn from past mistakes. Take Zimbabwe for example: since the 2000 govt-sponsored land-grab, their Govt tried their very best to create an economic basket-case example, for the purpose for the rest of world's academics to kindly use during economic studies/teachings. Very noble of Zimbabwe to do this. They succeeded, with the economic results clear today, and we all can learn. Except, SA govt cannot learn...instead, they want to improve on Zimbabwe's basket-case example.
  37. Sensei

    23 April 2019 @ 6:37 am
  38. The rule of law is the foundation of an economy. There is a constant decay of the rule of law under a socialist government because the rule of law is part and parcel of a free market system. The protection of property rights forms the basis of the law. It is clear, therefore, that the ANC government and lawlessness and plunder goes hand in hand. This is exactly what the people voted for when they supported the ANC. Every individual who supports the ANC do so in an effort to share in the looting. How can we expect such an organisation, with supporters of such deficient calibre, to grow an economy? "Now since man is naturally inclined to avoid pain- and since labour is pain in itself- it follows that men will resort to plunder whenever plunder is easier than work. History shows this quite clearly. And under these conditions, neither religion nor morality can stop it. When, then, does plunder stop? It stops when it becomes more painful and more dangerous than labour. "It is evident, then, that the proper purpose of law is to use the power of its collective force to stop this fatal tendency to plunder instead of to work. All the measures of the law should protect property and punish plunder. People are beginning to realize that the apparatus of government is costly. But what they do not know is that the burden falls inevitably on them." - Frederic Bastiat "The Law" 1850
  39. Sensei

    23 April 2019 @ 1:26 pm
  40. He is correct actually. Eskom is sitting on a heap of government guarantees. So, if we want to be factually correct, it is the government that is on the brink of financial collapse. Take it one step further - Luthuli House is on the brink of collapse.
The top commented articles of the past 7 days.
    Ingé Lamprecht / 23 April 2019 The long-term interventions required will, almost without exception, be unpopular among voters.
     39      34
    Ana Monteiro and Felix Njini, Bloomberg / 23 April 2019 Minister says the government has the problem 'well under control'.
     4      28
    Amogelang Mbatha, Bloomberg / 18 April 2019 'The credibility of the office has plummeted,' says Corruption Watch director.
     264      26
    Makgopa Tshehla / 20 April 2019 By conservative estimation, Kusile and Medupi debt costs amount to R300bn.
     141      24
    Antony Sguazzin, Bloomberg / 17 April 2019 Social, economic and governance measures deteriorate drastically in the past 12 years.
     108      18
    Aarti Bhana / 18 April 2019 Motor manufacturers agree that consumers 'need not worry' about load shedding risk.
     76      16
    Patrick Cairns / 18 April 2019 It's a global question.
     79      16
    Steven Friedman / 20 April 2019 The number of protests across SA have not increased, they have just become more noticed.
     82      12
    Colleen Goko and Paul Vecchiatto, Bloomberg / 19 April 2019 Documents show the government was forced to pay R5bn in emergency funds so Eskom could meet obligations.
     92      11
    Ingé Lamprecht / 18 April 2019 In an environment of negative sentiment, mispricing may create opportunities.
     88      10
    Joris Tieleman / 22 April 2019 The economics taught at university poorly reflects real world issues, whether they are political, environmental or social.
     112      9
    Tebogo Tshwane / 18 April 2019 Ayo executive gives candid account of governance issues at the company after being subpoenaed to appear before the commission.
     112      8
    Stealthy Wealth / 21 April 2019 'Normal' is often not very efficient and far from optimal - especially when it comes to planning for retirement.
     180      7
    Mfuneko Toyana, Reuters / 19 April 2019 Head of AgriSA says an alternative report has been released on 'proven agricultural practice and sustainable economic growth.'
     90      7
    Patrick Cairns / 23 April 2019 Why should we care if the asset management industry is dominated by men?
     24      7
    Paul Burkhardt, Bloomberg / 17 April 2019 'We know what needs to be done and we have an idea of how it should be done,' says Hadebe.
     23      7
    Adriaan Kruger / 17 April 2019 Plans to reopen the Steenkampskraal mine, which sits on one of the world's largest reserves of strategic rare earth minerals, are proceeding steadily.
     152      6
    Paul Vecchiatto, Bloomberg / 19 April 2019 The transfer is part of a R23bn support pledge by the government, for the current fiscal year.
     73      6
    Sinesipho Maninjwa / 23 April 2019 Things were not as profitable as they seemed.
     79      5
    Nqobile Dluda, Reuters / 19 April 2019 The proposed deal will see Wiese's voting interest reduced to 17.8% from 42.3%.
     94      4
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